Energean completes pipe laying, subsea installation offshore Israel

3667 views
2 mins read

Greek oil and gas producer Energean on Monday announced the completion of a key milestone in the Karish and Tanin pipeline development project, offshore Israel.

Energean’s partner, TechnipFMC, has successfully completed on time the laying of the Gas Sales Pipeline and the main deepwater installations of the subsea production systems.

The pipelay vessel, Solitaire, completed the core installation of a 30’’ and 24’’ pipeline of 90.3 km length, at depths of up to 1,700 metres.

“The full pipeline installation, including a significant Tie In Manifold structure (TIM-Water Depth 72m) and the pre-commissioning program, is expected to be completed in 4Q 2020, well within the project schedule,” said Energean in a statement.

“The pipeline was laid at an average rate, excluding the beach pull, of 4,578 meters per day which represents a world-class performance by TechnipFMC,” it added.

The construction support vessel, Normand Cutter, completed the installation of the production manifold and subsea isolation valve foundations and structures.

The Installation of the three sets of risers (2×10” and 1×16”) that will connect the three producing wells to the FPSO and then to the Gas Sales Pipeline is expected to commence in 4Q 2020 and be completed in 1Q 2021.

“More than 400 personnel have worked on these offshore operations, during which zero Lost Time Injuries occurred. The overall physical progress of the Karish Development project now stands at 80% complete.”

Energean’s Vincent Reboul Salze, Project Director – Karish EPCIC, said: “We are very satisfied with the current installation performance on the subsea scope until now.

The East Med in spring has proven to be a favourable environment and the pipelay performance has been remarkable on all aspects.”

Energean has made a pitch to sell its Israeli natural gas to Cyprus via pipeline at a “competitive price” while Nicosia is opting for LNG.

It has offered to build a $350 mln pipeline to Cyprus — using its own money — to supply gas from its Karish North field to the island.

So far, Cyprus has said it does not need the pipeline as it plans to install a floating LNG import terminal.

It is also set to award a long-term supply contract for LNG — in effect creating a single-supply market.